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The Navy recently launched the second round of an ongoing initiative known as Reducing Administrative Distractions (RAD), meant to solicit feedback from Sailors and Navy civilians on how to focus their daily activities on “Warfighting First.”

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert launched the initial RAD campaign last summer to evaluate how the fleet managed administrative duties considered to be distractions from primary mission readiness.

According to NAVADMIN 117/14, Sailors and Navy civilians submitted more than 1,400 ideas, resulting in changes to the number of General Military Training (GMT) requirements, advancements in digitizing Material, Maintenance and Management (3M) programs, Common Access Card (CAC) utilization, establishment of a Navy wiki-encyclopedia, and Anti-Terrorism Force Protection (ATFP) reforms.

The second round of RAD started May 15, and leaders are urging personnel at all levels to contribute new ideas.

“Our goal is to help you alleviate these administrative burdens by removing as many unnecessary and redundant processes we can identify,” wrote Rear Adm. Herman Shelanski, director, Assessment Division, in an email to Navy commanding officers, executive officers and command master chiefs. “We will either eliminate them, centralize them, outsource them, make them more efficient, or convert them to an electronic format.”

The program provides an opportunity for the fleet to share thoughts and possible solutions, he added.

Participation is voluntary, and personnel can take part by creating an online account at https://navyrad.ideascale.com. First-time users will need to log on from a .mil email address, but once registered, can create a password to log on from home without a CAC. The website offers users a chance to read suggestions by others, make comments, vote on ideas, and see progress based on suggestions made in the first iteration of RAD last year.

During the 2013 RAD campaign, 7,350 users posted more than 7,600 comments and 91,000 votes on ideas.

This year’s RAD forum will remain open on the IdeaScale website until mid-July, after which feedback will be offered regarding initiatives being evaluated based on the ideas and comments submitted.

“This effort will only be successful if leadership across all levels participate to identify solutions, and continue to encourage a culture of change and innovation across the deck plates,” the NAVADMIN states. “This is an opportunity to save hundreds of man hours, further empower commanding officers, and improve our Sailors’ ‘quality of work’ without lowering standards.”

To learn more about the program or create an account, visit https://navyrad.ideascale.com.

For more news and information from around Naval District Washington, visit www.NavDistWash.org or follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NavDistWash.